Mock-Tudor home for sale on modest street leaves people reeling at incredible design

The amazing four-bed townhouse has gone on sale for £500,000, but it stands out on the modest street due to its mock-Tudor style, sparking a conversation online

If you’re looking for a new home, this property is perfect for those with medieval interests.

The owners let their imaginations run wild as transformed this property, which is obvious as you walk along the street, with the incredible mock-Tudor style standing out.

The townhouse has gone on sale for £500,000 – and attracted attention online, with people divided over its incredible facade.

The 1930s property’s features emulate the real thing, with wooden beams on the facade of the building and a steep roof.

The swanky pad also boasts two shower rooms, a guest bathroom, a large reception area, a kitchen and off-street parking.

It’s on the market for a cool half a million pounds so would-be buyers will need to be flush.

But some house hunters claimed King Henry VIII would be turning his grave if he could see the unseemly terraced houses neighbouring the ‘Tudor Revival’ building.

Architecture enthusiasts took to social media to blast an unknown developer for building offending terraces in Barking, east London.

“Disgraceful to build a row of 1990s terraces next to a Tudor townhouse,” raged one person.

Others called for the culprit to be locked up in the Tower of London, sort of.

Another blasted: “Whoever did this should be arrested!”

But a third added: “I’m saying this is a work of genius.”

“Michael gove in the club but represented as houses,” joked another.

Advertising the property, estate agent William H Brown said: “This four/five bedroom townhouse boasts a large reception room, large kitchen/diner, shower room and a lean-to which is currently being used as bedroom five.

“To the first floor are two double bedrooms and a WC.

“To the top floor, you have one double bedroom, one single bedroom and a shower room.”

Mock Tudor architecture, which models itself on housing from the time of King Henry VIII’s family dynasty, became popular in the late 19th century.